Employee Motivation

Topics: Management, Motivation, Employment Pages: 29 (9457 words) Published: January 25, 2012
Insights Into Employee Motivation, Commitment and Retention

Barbara J. Kreisman Ph.D. Research/White Paper Insights Denver February, 2002

The Leadership Journey is a supervisory, management, and leadership training system consisting of 24 courses delivered on DVD, CD-ROM, VHS, and Online. Call 1-800-541-7872 or visit www.btedemo.com to preview courses. Page

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Table of Contents
Executive Summary…….3 W hy Employee Retention and Motivation Is Important…….5 Turbulence In The Work Environment…….5 At The Root Of The Problem—Demographics…….6 Retention As A Strategic Business Issue…….6 Calculating The Cost Of Attrition…….8 Why Employees Become Disengaged and Leave…….9 The Phenomena Of Intrinsic Motivation…….13 Turnover Is Not A Binary Event……. 14 How Insights Can Help Attract, Motivate and Retain Valuable Employees…….16 Manager/Employee Relationship and Insights…….16 Job Descriptions and Insights…….16 Selection (Interviewing) and Insights…….16 New Employee Orientation and Insights…….18 Career Development and Insights…….19 Performance Management, Feedback and Insights…….20 Team Linkage and Insights…….20 Retention Is Not For Everyone…….20 References…….22 Biography of Barbara J. Kreisman…….24

The Leadership Journey is a supervisory, management, and leadership training system consisting of 24 courses delivered on DVD, CD-ROM, VHS, and Online. Call 1-800-541-7872 or visit www.btedemo.com to preview courses.

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Executive Summary
Employee commitment, productivity and retention issues are emerging as the most critical workforce management challenges of the immediate future, driven by employee loyalty concerns, corporate restructuring efforts and tight competition for key talent. For many firms, “surprise” employee departures can have a significant effect on the execution of business plans and may eventually cause a parallel decline in productivity. This phenomenon is especially true in light of current economic uncertainty and following corporate downsizings when the impact of losing critical employees increases exponentially (Caplan and Teese, 1997; Ambrose, 1996; Noer, 1993). Research shows that the working population can be divided into several categories: people who are engaged (loyal and productive), those who are not engaged (just putting in time), and those who are actively disengaged (unhappy and spreading their discontent). Thus, as noted by Marcus Buckingham, SVP Gallup and author of “First Break All the Rules”, even in the “best of times”, (i.e. the late 1990’s), only 26 per cent of the working population is fully engaged in their work. The rest of the population is either “not engaged” (55 per cent) or “actively disengaged” (26 per cent. (Buckingham and Coffman, 1999). Productivity and retention rates generally fall further as employees become distracted, confused and preoccupied with potential outcomes immediately following an organizational transition such as a major restructuring, corporate downsizing, merger, acquisition, or even rapid growth spurt (Cartwright and Cooper, 1999; Bridges, 1991).

Recent studies have shown that the manager, whether a front-line supervisor, a project leader, team ‘captain’, or senior manager, actually has more power than anyone else to reduce unwanted turnover. Why? Because the factors that drive employee satisfaction and commitment are largely within the direct manager’s control (Buckingham and Coffman, 1999; Kaye and Jordan-Evans, 1999). These include providing recognition

The Leadership Journey is a supervisory, management, and leadership training system consisting of 24 courses delivered on DVD, CD-ROM, VHS, and Online. Call 1-800-541-7872 or visit www.btedemo.com to preview courses. Page

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and feedback, the opportunity to learn and grow, fair compensation reflecting an employee’s contributions and value to the organization, a good work environment, and above all, recognition and respect for the uniqueness of each person’s competencies, needs,...

References: Ambrose, Delores, (1996). Healing the downsized organization. New York: Three Rivers Press. Bridges, William. (1991). Managing transitions—Making the most of change. Cambridge, MA: Perseus Books. Cameron, Kim S. and Quinn, Robert E. (1999). Diagnosing and changing organizational culture. Massachusetts: Addison Wesley. Capplan, Gayle and Teese, Mary. (1997). Survivors—How to keep your best people on board after downsizing. Palo Alto, CA: Davies-Black Publishing. Cascio, Wayne F. (1991). Costing human resources: The financial impact of behavior in organizations. Boston: PWS-Kent Publishing. Ciulla, Joanne B. (2000). The working life—the promise and betrayal of modern work. New York: Random House. Collins, Michelle LeDuff. (2000). The thin book of 360 feedback—A manager’s guide. NewYork: Thin Book Publishing Co. Corporate Leadership Council (1998). Employee retention—New strategies for managing workforce stability and engagement. Corporate Executive Board. Cox, Allen. (1996). Redefining corporate soul—Linking purpose and people. Chicago: Irwin Professional Publishing. Dalton, Gene and Thompson, Paul. (1993). Novations—Strategies for career management. Utah: Brigham Young Press. Deal, Terrence and Kennedy, Allen. (1999). The new corporate cultures—Revitalizing the workplace after downsizing, mergers, and reengineering. Cambridge, MA: Perseus Books. Dibble, Suzanne. (1999). Keeping your valuable employees—Retention strategies for your organization’s most important resource. New York: John Wiley and Sons. Inc. Fitz-enz, Jac. (2000). The ROI of human capital—Measuring the economic value of employee performance. New York: American Management Association. Hall, Douglas, T. and Associates. (1996). The career is dead, long live the career. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers. Herman, Roger E. (1999). Keeping good people—Strategies for solving the #1 problem facing business today. Winchester, VA: Oakhill Press.
The Leadership Journey is a supervisory, management, and leadership training system consisting of 24 courses delivered on DVD, CD-ROM, VHS, and Online. Call 1-800-541-7872 or visit www.btedemo.com to preview courses. Page
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Kay, Beverly and Jordan-Evans. (1999). Love ‘em or lose ‘em—Getting good people to stay. San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler Publishers, Inc. Kreisman, Barbara J. (2002). Identification of the drivers of employee dissatisfaction and turnover. Unpublished Doctoral Dissertation. Austin, TX: University of Texas. Michaels, Ed, Handfield-Jones, Helen and Axelrod, Beth. (2001). The war for talent. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press. Mitchell, Lawrence E. (2002). Corporate irresponsibility—America’s newest export. New Haven & London: Yale University Press. Naisbitt, John and Aburdene, Patricia. (1990). Ten new directions for the 1990’s— Megatrends 2000. New York: William Morrow and Company, Inc. Noer, David. (1993). Healing the wounds—Overcoming the trauma of layoffs and revitalizing downsized organizations. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. O’Malley, Michael N. (2000). Creating Commitment—How to attract and retain talented employees by building relationships that last. New York: John Wiley and Sons, Inc. Reichheld, Frederick F. (2001). Loyalty rules! How today’s leaders build lasting relationships. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press. Schein, Edgar. (1999). The corporate culture survival guide. San Francisco: JosseyBass. Schein, Edgar. (1990). Career anchors—Discovering your real values. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Schein, Edgar. (1978). Career dynamics: Matching individual and organizational needs. Massachusetts: Addison-Wesley. Staw, Barry M. (1991). Psychological dimensions of organizational behavior. New Jersey: Prentice Hall. Thomas, Kenneth W. (2000). Intrinsic motivation at work—Building energy and commitment. San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler. Trice, Harrison M. and Beyer, Janice M. (1993). The cultures of work organizations. New Jersey: Prentice Hall.
The Leadership Journey is a supervisory, management, and leadership training system consisting of 24 courses delivered on DVD, CD-ROM, VHS, and Online. Call 1-800-541-7872 or visit www.btedemo.com to preview courses. Page
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Biography of Barbara J. Kreisman Barbara Kreisman is a Principal of the Insights-Denver Learning Center and accredited Insights Faculty Member. Additionally she is co-founder and Principal of Intergistic Solutions Consulting Firm which has offices in Denver, CO and Austin, TX. Barbara consults primarily in the areas of individual, team and organizational effectiveness and has over 25 years of direct experience in Organizational Development and Human Resource-related specialties. She has been employed by several Fortune 100 companies including Dell Computer Corporation, Monsanto and Motorola and has consulted with clients representing High Tech, Health Care, Construction and Process Manufacturing industries. Barbara has conducted exhaustive research in the area of Organizational Behavior, and is a Ph.D. Candidate at the University of Texas. Her degree is interdisciplinary, with coursework drawn from UT’s Departments of Management, Marketing, Organizational Communication, Human Resource Development and Psychology. Her dissertation is on the subject of “Identifying the Drivers of Employee Dissatisfaction and Turnover”. She holds two Masters Degrees--one in Human Resource Development from the University of Texas and the other in Career Counseling from Arizona State University. Barbara is qualified to use numerous diagnostic tools including: The Insights Discovery System, Myers Briggs Type Indicator, Birkman Assessment Methodology, Strong Campbell Occupational Inventory, FIRO B and Thomas Kilmann Conflict Mode. She is a certified Team Facilitator, Employee Retention Trainer, Four-Stage Career Model Facilitator and Workforce Diversity Trainer. Barbara is a member of the Society of Human Resource Management, ASTD and the Association of Psychological Type. She is a certified practitioner of Virtual CEO.
The Leadership Journey is a supervisory, management, and leadership training system consisting of 24 courses delivered on DVD, CD-ROM, VHS, and Online. Call 1-800-541-7872 or visit www.btedemo.com to preview courses. Page
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